Alaska's Premier                                                              Fly Fishing Source

Alaska's Premier Fly Fishing Source

The rivers and shoreline around Juneau host a wealth of fly fishing opportunities. From sea run Dolly Varden in the spring to pink and chum salmon in the summer and ending with silver salmon in the fall, there is something to cast a fly to from early May until late September.

If you are looking for a guided fly fishing trip, at this time there is only one outfitter in Juneau. 

  1. A fly out fly fishing trip with Bearcreek Outfitters. www.juneauflyfishing.com. Bearcreek predominantly works with anglers arriving by cruise ship. They supply rods, reels, waders and flies along with a snack. The guides are good, they are helpful with novice anglers, and the trip is a lot of fun. Just the flight itself is amazing. If you are traveling alone they can often fit you in with a group. They also can do custom trips if you have 3 or more anglers. See their website for current pricing and booking information.

We should note (since we get asked this a lot), there is no river oriented fly fishing guide service that operates in Juneau that guides via car or boat. Most of the streams that you can drive to in Juneau are on U.S. Forest Service land and commercial permits are not available for guiding on them. However, you can bring your own rod, reel and waders and fish any number of these streams. We are more than happy to suggest places to go and flies to use. Add a comment

Typically the sockeye salmon are just starting to spawn in the Brooks River come early September. 6mm mottled beads in brighter oranges and reds tend to be the best producers.  Mottled Trout Beads in Dark Roe, Mandarin Roe, Tangerine Roe, Natural Roe and Hot Cherry can all be winners.  Also check out Mark's Trout Food.  These are hand painted and really kick butt.  Tryt them in Dark, Natural and Tangerine.  They are a bit more expensive than the commercially packaged beads, but worth every penny!
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Thanks for your inquiry with us about roadside fishing in Juneau. Depending on the time you are arriving in Juneau, there is a variety of fishing you could be doing. From salmon fishing to trout fishing, there can be a lot going on. Pink and Chum salmon begin their migration to Juneau in July and August, and the Silver Salmon begin to return late August through September and October. The Dolly Varden and Cutthroat trout around that time of year are often in the creeks and feeding on salmon eggs.

So, that being said there are several road system fisheries you can hit in Juneau as well as surrounding towns and areas. If you have access to a boat or plane while you are here, that opens up a whole world of possibility as well. Juneau road side fisheries include Sheep, Salmon, Montana and Cowee Creek. There are also shore casting opportunites for salmon around Echo Cove, Pt. Louisa, and Fish Creek. 

We write weekly fishing reports that we post every Thursday afternoon, and you can follow along each week before you arrive to see what is going on, here. Alternatively, you can give us a call closer to when you arrive in Juneau and we can help gear you up.

Happy Fishing! 

-Kayla 
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The Dolly Llama is a unique streamer in that it can be fished in a multitude of ways.  Probably the easiest and most common way to fish the Llama is with a standard streamer technique. Streamer techniques are used when flies are being fished to imitate baitfish, sculpins or as an attractor. Basically it's cast the fly out, rod tip down by the water and strip it back in. If you are fishing silvers, this is your technique! The length and rate of retrieve really depend on the targeted species and situation. Sometimes a strip/pause or a strip/strip/pause rhythm can be deadly.

As I mentioned before, though, there are multiple way to fish this fly.  Often when fishing it in a larger river from a boat, anglers will drift the fly before retrieving it.  Cast the fly slightly upstream of the boat and use a hi sticking technique to drift the fly along the bottom.  After it drifts past the boat, strip it back in and repeat. When fishing it this way, It can pay dividends to lift and drop the fly during the drift.  This give the fly a jigging motion that fish die for. This technique can be done from shore too, especially on small to medium size streams. When drifting Dolly Llamas, be prepared to snag up quite a bit.

Another technique popular for fishing Chinook, Steelhead and early season Rainbows is to swing the fly. This can be done with or without a sink tip. With this technique you will be fishing moving water. Cast the fly quartering down and across the run.  An upstream mend can be added here to allow the fly to sink.  From here allow the current to sweep the fly across until it is directly down stream of you.  If you haven't hooked up yet, pump your rod back and forth so that it pulls the fly upstream and allows it to drop back down.  You're literally pulling the fly away from the fish and dropping the fly back in its face.  Tricky!

Dolly Llamas can be fished with both a straight floating line or with a sink tip.  The larger sized Llamas (#4 or larger) are very heavy and can be difficult to cast.  Anytime you can get away with using a shorter leader, especially with a floating line, do so.  With a floating line, salmon/steelhead leaders of 7.5' to 6' in length are much easier to cast than standard 9' salmon/steelhead leaders.  Often the fly will fish better with a 9' leader, but it becomes much more difficult to cast.

We hope that this is insightful.  

Best of luck on the water,

Alaska Fly Fishing Goods Add a comment

I would say the Simms G3 Wader is the best performer. Here is my two cents on why they are so good:
  1. The Simms G3 Waders are built in Montana and the attention to detail really shows. These waders are built by anglers and all the little details that only anglers know about really come through. 
  2. They have a right and left "anatomically correct" neoprene foot. This means the bootie actually fits your foot and is more comfortable inside a wading boot. 
  3. They are built with 3-layer Gore-Tex in the upper body for maximum breathability and 5-layer Gore-Tex from the mid thigh down for super durability. 
  4. The fit of the Simms waders are the best in the industry. For instance, each area of the wader is specifically cut for just that wader size. So a Medium G3 will have a narrower leg and calf area than a Large, etc. 
  5. The seam on the leg is on the front of the wader rather than down the inside inseam to decrease wear on the seam. 
  6. I could go on and on....
Bottom line, for $499, you cannot beat the Simms G3 wader. 

We have a large variety of sizes in stock and can special order other sizes. Please call or email if you have other questions. Add a comment

The Clouser Minnow is typically tied on standard saltwater hooks like the Tiemco 811s or Daiichi 2546.  We have our shop standard shop clousers tied on the 811s.  These are fairly expensive hooks and Umpqua offers the U400 series which is a similar hooks, but about half the price.  For silver and other species of salmon, these hooks are great.  For saltwater (bonefish, permit, etc...) it pays dividends to go with the better hooks.

Personally, I like the Tiemco 9394 for tying my clouser.  This is a 3x strong, 4 long nickel plated hook.  The reason I like these hooks is that I can create a longer profile to my clousers, which I like for salt and estuaries.    This hook only comes up to a size two, so when I'm looking to make a larger profile clouser, then I us the 811s 1/0. I hope this helps,

Best Regards,

Mike Add a comment

The best hook sizes for Alaskan coho flies are #1/0, #2 and #4. Coho like big flies and don't shy away from a relatively big hook. 

If you are tying your own flies or are buying flies for coho, this range of sizes is ideal.  Add a comment

The Mega Dolly Llama is a deadly pattern for both kings and silvers.  With that being said, the Mega is a 1/2" longer and uses the largest conehead produced. This means that it is harder to cast and can be a arm/should destroyer after long fishing sessions.  We recommend sticking with the #2 for silvers unless you need the added weight for getting the fly deeper.

We hope that this is insightful.

-Alaska Fly Fishing Goods Add a comment

Salmon fishing during the third week of July will land you right in the middle of the pink salmon and chum salmon runs. Dolly Varden char and cuttroat trout will be available too. In some areas sockeye salmon are running. Sockeye tend to return to river systems with lakes on them and sockeye are not nearly as wide spread in the Tongass as pinks and chums. 

Silver salmon and kings will be around out in the saltwater but not in fly rod range. For a selection of flies for this time of year check out our Chum & Pink Selection. Add a comment

For Alaska fishing, where you might be chucking lead eye leeches for Dolly Varden, followed by bulky mouse patterns for rainbows and then even dry flies for grayling, you need something that can do it all. 

We recommend a slightly overweighted floating line. By this we mean if you are using a 6 weight rod, the line should be more like a 6.5 or larger. This will help turn over big flies, cast well into the wind, and load your rod easily at close quarters. 

Three of our favorites are:

They all excel at the heavy fly game and still are smooth enough to land a dry fly when you need to. They are also very high quality and will last for years.  Add a comment
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Fly Fishing in Alaska for the first time Brad Elfers has been a fly fishing & river guide in Alaska since 1993.
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